Did the Provincial Council System change Sri Lankan Governance System?

Dr. Nawarathna Bandara,Former Head, Department of Political Science, University of Peradeniya Speaks about the “Did the Provincial Council System change Sri Lankan Government System?”. This video is created to enhance citizens’ awareness of constitutional reforms in Sri Lanka.

20th Amendment to the Constitution

Dr. P. Saravanamuttu, Executive Director of Centre for Policy Alternatives (CPA) speaks about the “20th Amendment of the Constitution” and its impact on the checks and balances of power of three branches of the government. This video is created to enhance citizens’ awareness of constitutional reforms in Sri Lanka.

What is the impact of the Official Languages ​​Act, 1956 on the Constitution?

Mr. S.G. Punchihewa, Attorney at Law, speaks about the term “What is the impact of the Official Languages ​​Act, 1956 on the Constitution?” and the impact for the constitution. This video is created to enhance citizens’ awareness of constitutional reforms in Sri Lanka.

1957 Bandaranaike – Chelvanayagam Agreement

Mr. Lionel Guruge, Senior Researcher CPA speaks about the term “1957 Bandaranaike – Chelvanayagam Agreement” and the impact for the constitution. This video is created to enhance citizens’ awareness of constitutional reforms in Sri Lanka.

Whose entitlement are elections?

The number of elections held so far since the country gained universal suffrage is 74 and we have a very formal mechanism for holding elections. However, some electoral reforms that need to be introduced immediately to ensure a more effective electoral process. Thus, the Centre for Monitoring Election Violence (CMEV), as one of the active election observation bodies in the country, will hold an online discussion on some of such electoral reforms. The discussion will be based on the last two national-level elections held in the country, Parliamentary and Presidential Elections. Therefore, please visit the ASIAN Mirror Youtube Channel or CMEV Facebook page at 6.00 pm on the 19th February 2021 as shown below to extend your active participation.

Please watch full program via the following links:

https://fb.watch/3NaTHKvgDI/

The challenge of regulating election campaign expenditure: Why is Sri Lanka’s youth generation silent?

One of the focus areas of which the Centre for Monitoring Election Violence (CMEV) has been vocal in parallel with the electoral reform process in Sri Lanka since several decades ago, is the need to regulate unlimited election campaign expenditure in Sri Lanka and to introduce an appropriate legislative mechanism. It is gratifying to note that there has been a strong social focus on this election-related theme at the time, and the Centre for Election Violence Monitoring has also spearheaded various initiatives aimed at continuing a broader social dialogue on the subject matter.

As part of the series of online programs being organized on the above topic, another such program being arranged to be conducted in collaboration with the ‘Next Generation’. We look forward to discussing the challenges facing young political activists in this country in the face of unregulated and unlimited election campaign finances, and we hope that all citizens who aspire to a Level Playing Field in the electoral process will join us in this discussion.

Please watch full program via the following link:

Women’s political activism is underestimated by insecure politicians

Women’s political activism became more active in the country around 1919 with the island-wide movement for women’s suffrage. Even though it has been more or less the opportunity to contest elections since then, getting nominations for women activists is still not an easy task. The forthcoming Provincial Council election will certainly be a challenging occasion. If given a chance, there are a large number of women political activists who aspire to contest elections.

This issue was also discussed extensively during a series of training programs for women political activists organized by the Centre for Monitoring Election Violence (CMEV) in collaboration with IRI and this short video contains the views expressed by R.Iresha Udeni Hettihewa of the Sri Lanka Podujana Peramuna (SLPP) who participated in this Uva Provincial Workshop.

Identifying Women Political Activists

Various activists and civil society organizations in the country have, for a long time, been calling for specific recognition for women’s political activism. The 25% quota for women, established for local government bodies, was a significant milestone. Although it confirmed only 23.5% female representation at the end of the election, it was a hallmark of Sri Lanka’s future women’s political representation. The most interesting trend in that process was the emergence of a strong women’s force of 1926 compared to only 88 female members in local government bodies before the quota system.

One way to further reinforce the future political activism of women is to give them an appropriate and sufficient understanding of the procedures of the institutional system and the laws on local governance. The Centre for Monitoring Election Violence (CMEV) will continue to support them in this regard. This short video has been prepared with the views of female local government representatives who participated in a series of programs conducted in collaboration with the International Republican Institute (IRI). 

Mitigating Electoral Threats to Increase Women’s Participation in the Political Process

CMEV is passionate about women’s political activism in the country and continues to promote and encourage women’s political activism.

Simultaneously, a series of workshops were held covering the entire island in the recent past. Here is a very short video made of the opinions shared by Surangi Samaratunga, a Member of the Anuradhapura Municipal Council representing the Sri Lanka Podujana Peramuna (SLPP) at the workshop held in the North Central Province.

CMEV organized the event in collaboration with the International Republican Institute (IRI) as part of a Series of Post- Election Assessment Workshops with Women Local Government Representatives and Political Activists.

Are Sri Lankans not eligible for an Advance Voting System – Potential Opportunities”

The number of people who lose the opportunity to cast their vote in every election held in this country is unlimited. That number was close to 3 million at the last election. Although there may be a certain percentage of people in the country who abstain from voting to protest without voting, most live in a background where the facilities to cast their votes are marginal.
To provide an Advance Voting facility to the voters of this country, there should be a continuous dialogue among the electoral stakeholders and there should be a special focus and interest on it among the newly elected members of Parliament as well.
The second Virtual Discussion organized by CMEV in association with DRI will be held from 6.00 PM to 7.30 PM on the 20th of December 2020.

Please watch full program via the following  link: https://fb.watch/2v5flPvMp2/